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We lost my Father in law last year, to an extended cancer, and my Mother in law is having a very hard time. So I thought about this quilt with hands from all the family to bring her comfort and cheer her up. Caring and helping hands from all the family, to let her know she was not alone and that we would always stand by her side. My sisters in law loved the idea and secretly collected templates from their hands. My three sisters in law live in the same town as my mother in law, an almost three hour drive from Madrid. We are the only ones that are stuck in the city.

Last weekend was Mother's Day here, so we went to visit and gave her the finished quilt. WOW ... I don't think anyone has ever missed the point as badly as I have LOL. I mean, she LOVES the quilt, I'm sure of that, everyone loved it ... but she cried every time she set her eyes on it. It's just emotion overtaking her, but this is not what anyone expected. This was supposed to bring comfort to her, and it brings her to tears. Oh my God ... what have I done? I had to tell her if she didn't stop crying I would bring the quilt back to Madrid with us ... just kidding, of course, but she cried over that too. Today I spoke with one of my sisters in law and ... M-i-l still overflows with tears at the sight of that quilt. Isn't this horrible?? I feel so bad.

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Comment by Janet S. - MO on May 7, 2009 at 4:00pm
I agree with Susan (well said!) - know she loves the quilt and the effort and love you put into it. Grief is a mischevious thing.......different for all, but grief is a cleansing and growth.
Comment by Joana Simmers/GA on May 7, 2009 at 1:34pm
Carmen, maybe what your MIL is an excuse to cry. My dearest friend's husband dies three and a half years ago and within weeks people were telling her that it was time to be through with grieving and that she needed to move on. HAH! People become impatient with the emotions of others (not you or your family, but others do). If it's too much for her, she'll put it away for a while and then bring it back out, but probably this is a balm to her soul.
Comment by Susan Gatewood/VA on May 7, 2009 at 1:02pm
Carmen,
I know your MIL loves the quilt. And remember that tears can be very cleansing. O get teased all the time, because I cry so easily. I even cry over Hallmard greeting cards commercials! Your MIL and your SILs are so lucky to have you.
Susan
Comment by Pam/NY on May 7, 2009 at 12:50pm
Carmen-
It's nice to hear from you...I agree with Cheryl...she probably thought no one really cared as much as you demonstrated through making such a personal gift...great idea...
Comment by Cheryl / NC on May 7, 2009 at 11:31am
Carmen, Don't feel bad! It does bring her comfort! She is probably a bit overwhelmed at this point by all the love being directed to her right now. That always makes me cry, but it's happy tears! I remember sobbing like a baby the night my granddaughter was born. Every time I held her or talked about her all I could do was cry! She was so perfect, such a gift! I was overwhelmed with emotion every time I looked at her. My DH joked that if I kept it up I was going to give the baby a complex! It took about 8 weeks for me to stop crying over her, she turned 5 last week and is still the greatest joy of my life, and yes every once in a while I still cry from the joy. That's probably how it is with your mother-in-law. You showed her how loved she is, those aren't tears of grief! Give her some time, she'll stop crying over it. What a wonderful gift you gave her! To let her know how much she is loved is the most wonderful gift you could give her! No wonder she cries, she cries with joy, and that is a wonderful reason to shed tears!
HUGS to you, Cheryl

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